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March 28, 2008

Comments

Joanna Young

Thank you so much for sharing these. I hadn't appreciated the generative power of form until you mentioned it, and now I can see that's what's going on. It's been a fabulous project, I've learned so much.

Your last section is very powerful, and I can feel the necessity you express, that it's time to write.

For me too.

Joanna

Dale

A pleasure to read this entry. Thanks. I know what you mean about the generative power of form. Isn't it funny how we keep re-discovering over and over some of those same root principles, yet each time dressed in a new coat? Remember Wordsworth's "Nuns Fret Not" (http://www.bartleby.com/101/533.html)?
Dale

Glenn

I just found your blog through the links Joanna posted in her 4x4 Results notice, and have really enjoyed your writing.

Having read several other responses to her challenge, I have seen some trends and similarities emerge -- Your focus on envy as a source of inspiration is the first I have seen however, and made me realize how much envy, or at least a competitive spirit, influenced my writing. After a few friends of mine won recognition in a few writing contests, I looked in the mirror and told myself I could do better than them. It was probably not the most noble way to become inspired, but that was the source of ignition which set me off... so I reckon I owe some credit to "the deadly sins approach."

Great post, keep up the excellent writing.

joanna

God, you're one amazing writer, Holly.

Barbara

Hello from a former adjunct teacher who left the fringes of academia to start a new life as a freelance writer/reporter in Peru.

I remember teaching Lit classes at Santa Fe Community College, in Gainesville, and learning, through a chance group discussion, what some of my students were earning at WalMart. They were making more money there than I was as an adjunct!


So hard, prepping for classes and grading and trying to make a difference as a teacher, and being paid the wages of a mouse. I think it's criminal how America's higher education system has evolved into a classist hierarchy of Haves and Have-nots, similar to Upstairs Downstairs.

Holly

Barbara, yes, I certainly agree it is an immoral system! I always choke a bit when my CC students say that they are in college to make more $$, assuming blithely that more degrees = more cash. I see former students around campus who have been hired for staff positions who make twice (nearly) what I do, teaching usually four classes per semester and one over the summer. I'm envious of yr exotic escape!! (I'll certainly check out that blog of yours--I'd be interested to see how the decision has played out.)

Barbara

Holly --
Yes, I know that choking feeling well! I have a friend (a brilliant woman with two master's degrees, one in poetry, the other in history# who after receiving her 2nd masters took a job at the university processing student loan information. She made so much more doing that labor than she did adjuncting #she had to pay off her own student loans#.

Writing in Peru is more lucrative #but more erractic an income source) than is teaching ESL in Peru. I was offered a job at a language institute here in November, paying the equivalent of $6.13/hour. Ugh! No matter where you go, they don't want to pay teachers a decent wage.

I'm sticking to writing for now. :)

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